Sweet Paul’s Book Picks Autumn 2017

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Sweet Paul's Book Picks Autumn 2017

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Dairy-Free Peach Pit Ice Cream

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Dairy-Free Peach Pit Ice Cream

Read my Fall 2017 Issue:

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This recipe is from my friend Michaela Hayes.  Here’s what Michalea has to say about it: 

"IN MY NEVER-ENDING QUEST TO WASTE LESS AND TO USE PARTS OF A PLANT OR FRUIT THAT ARE USUALLY OVERLOOKED, I fixated on the pits of stone fruit. Beautiful little orbs full of nooks and crannies and holding the elusive kernel inside, these pits usually end up in the compost. But before they go there, they can make another stop—to flavor liquids, giving them a light almond-like flavor.

All stone fruits—cherries, apricots, nectarines, peaches, plums, etc.—have pits, which contain a lot of flavor. And you can use any of these pits to infuse flavor into liquids, which can then be turned into all kinds of things. Both amaretto and the lesser-known Crème de Noyaux are liqueurs made from apricot kernels. The Pickled Cherries recipe I wrote for the Sweet Paul Summer 2013 issue uses the pits to create a more intensely flavored pickling liquid. You can wrap the pits inside a tea towel and smash them with a hammer to get at the kernels. Or you can use the whole pits with the kernels for flavoring.*

What better way to use the whole fruit than to make ice cream flavored with the pits and top it with the fresh fruit? Enjoy!"

Bring coconut milk and peach pits to a simmer, then remove from heat and allow to cool.  Infuse overnight for best flavor. Strain milk and stir together with remaining ingredients.  Process in an ice cream maker according to manufacturer’s instructions.                                             

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Lemon Tea Ganache Macarons

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Lemon Tea Ganache Macarons

Recipes + Food Styling by Christian Hümbs | Photography by Julia Cawley

Read my Fall 2017 Issue:

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Beat egg whites until they are foamy. Beat in white sugar and continue beating until egg whites are glossy and fluffy.  Sift confectioners’ sugar and ground almonds in a separate bowl, and fold the almond mixture into the egg whites. 3. Mix in the food coloring. Color should still be almost white with just a hint of yellow.  Mix in the food coloring. Color should still be almost white with just a hint of yellow.  Spoon the batter into a pastry bag (or a plastic bag with a small corner cut off), and pipe disks of batter, about 11/2 inches in diameter, onto prepared baking sheet. Leaving space between the discs.  Let the piped cookies stand out at room temperature until they form a hard skin on top, about 1 hour.  Preheat oven to 285°F.  Bake cookies for about 10 minutes. Let cookies cool completely before filling.  For the ganache: put the heavy cream and white chocolate into a small pot, and melt on low heat while stirring. Add the lemon juice.  Once you have a smooth ganache, pour it in a bowl, and let it cool down in the fridge for about an hour.  Then fill a pastry bag with the ganache and place a hazelnut sized portion onto a macaron. Place another macaron upside down onto it and squeeze gently. Repeat until all macarons are filled.                               

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Valerie Bertinelli’s B.L.T. Pasta

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Valerie Bertinelli's B.L.T. Pasta

BUY THE BOOK HERE!

From Valerie Bertinelli: " If you are looking to whip up a rich pasta awash in flavor, one that gives you the sense of being especially indulgent yet you want to avoid both cream sauce and lots of preparation—you have found the perfect recipe. One day when I found myself considering Tom’s and my dinner plans, I looked in the fridge and found bacon, arugula, and fresh basil. I already had tomatoes in a bowl on the counter. And I thought, “Wait a minute. This is a BLT. What if I put it all together?” I did, and the result was a splendidly tender pasta with a lightly acidic tomato-wine sauce that went perfectly with the smoky bacon. With the peppery kick of the arugula, it really was a BLT. You don’t want to overlook the basil, either. For the nuance of its sweetness, pluck it from your garden or pick it up that day at the grocery store."

Read my Fall 2017 Issue:

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Bring the water and 1/4 cup of the salt to a boil in a large saucepan over high. Hull the stems from the tomatoes. Cut a shallow “x” through the skin on the bottom of each tomato.  Place the tomatoes in the boiling water, and boil about 30 seconds. Using a slotted spoon, remove the tomatoes, and submerge in a bowl of ice water to stop the cooking process. Reserve the salted water in the saucepan.  When the tomatoes are cool enough to handle, peel back the skin using a paring knife. Cut the tomatoes in half lengthwise; squeeze out and discard the seeds. Chop the tomatoes into 1/2-inch pieces.  Place the bacon in a cold large skillet; cook over medium, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 10 to 13 minutes. Drain the bacon on a paper towel-lined plate. Reserve 2 tablespoons of drippings in the skillet.  Add the onion to the hot drippings in the skillet; cook over medium, stirring occasionally, until soft and lightly golden, about 10 minutes. Add the wine; cook until the liquid is reduced by half, about 3 minutes. Add the chopped tomatoes, black pepper, crushed red pepper, and remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt to the skillet; cook, stirring occasionally, until the tomatoes begin to break down, about 5 minutes.  Return the reserved salted water in the saucepan to a boil; add the spaghetti, and cook until al dente, about 10 minutes.  Drain the pasta, reserving 1 cup of the cooking water. Add the pasta and 1/4 cup of the reserved cooking water to the tomato mixture in the skillet; toss to coat. Add more cooking water, if necessary, until the mixture reaches the desired consistency.  Transfer to a large bowl; toss with arugula and half of the chopped bacon. Divide evenly among 4 serving bowls; top evenly with the basil, remaining chopped bacon, and Parmesan.                                   

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Corn Soup with Comté Cream and Herb Oil

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Corn Soup with Comté Cream and Herb Oil

The soup is perfect for late summer/early fall corn, but later in the season, you could substitute diced butternut squash. With either the corn or the butternut version, you can make the base ahead and freeze it. Then just thaw, reheat, and get a big wow factor from the cheese cream and herb purée—two accents that you can also make ahead.

Story  By Martha Holmberg Photography by Ellen Silverman

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For the herb oil: In a blender, combine 1⁄3 cup olive oil, herbs, and a pinch of salt. Blend until smooth and strain through a fine-meshed sieve into a small bowl. Press a small sheet of plastic wrap on top to prevent oxidation and set aside.  For the comte cream: Heat the cream in a medium saucepan until simmering. Simmer until slightly reduced and thickened, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat, whisk in the Comté, and season generously with salt and pepper. Keep warm if serving the soup hot; let cool if serving it chilled.  For the soup: In a large pot over medium heat, melt remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil and the butter. When foaming subsides, add onion, season generously with salt, and cook, stirring occasionally, until onion is softened and beginning to brown, about 15 minutes.  Add the water or broth and reserved corn cobs and bring to a boil. Reduce to maintain a brisk simmer and let cook 20 minutes.  Remove corn cobs, scraping with a spoon to remove any inner kernels. Add corn kernels, simmer for 4 minutes, and remove from heat.  Transfer to a blender, in batches if necessary, and purée on high until very smooth. Serve warm or chilled. Just before serving, drizzle or dollop the Comté cream over the soup, and then drizzle the herb oil on top. Drag a knife through the toppings to make a pretty pattern, top with herb sprigs, and serve.                                       

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Mormor’s Pork & Split Pea Soup

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Mormor’s Pork & Split Pea Soup

Read my Fall 2017 Issue:

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MY MORMOR WAS THE QUEEN OF SOUPS. All fall and winter, there was always a big pot of soup simmering away on the stove. She could take almost any ingredient and turn it into a creamy delicious soup. The amount of cream in her soups depended on her waistline. The great thing about Mormor’s amazing cooking was that even her soups without dairy were always creamy. My favorite soup of hers was the pork and split pea soup she would make every fall. It’s a brothy soup with pork, vegetables, and lentils—so good. Her secret: pig’s feet. Yep, you heard me, pig’s feet. I once asked her why she would use them, and she said they have an amazing pork taste and plenty of natural gelatin to make the soup rich tasting. When I wrinkled my nose at the mention of pig’s feet, she always said, “If it’s good enough for the French, it’s good enough for us.”

If you CAN’T EVEN with pig feet, you could make this with your favorite cut of pork.. but I think you should give my mormor’s way a try!

Rinse the peas, and place in a large pot.  Add 10 cups vegetable stock.  Rinse the pigs feet and place in the pot.  Let the soup simmer for about 11/2–2 hours; skim off any foam.  Remove the pigs feet, and let them cool.  Add vegetables and herbs to the soup, and let it simmer another 30–60 minutes, or until the peas and vegetables are tender.  Remove the skin and bones from the pig’s feet and shred the meat.  Puree the soup using an immersion blender, and add the meat. (Remember to remove the bay leaf before blending.)  Season with salt and pepper.  Serve with fresh parsley and some olive oil.                               

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White Chocolate Matcha Granola Bars

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White Chocolate Matcha Granola Bars

Recipes + Food Styling by Christian Hümbs & Photography by Julia Cawley

Read my Fall 2017 Issue:

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Preheat oven to 300°F.  Heat up the butter, brown sugar, honey, and lemon juice in a pan while stirring. Let everything caramelize for a couple of minutes.  Take the pan off the heat, and add the rolled oats, seeds, matcha powder, and cranberries. Mix well.  Pour the mix into a baking pan, about ²⁄3-inch high. Distribute everything with your fingers.  Bake at 300° for 16 minutes.  Let it cool down all the way, then cut into bars.  Melt the white chocolate, and dip the bottom of the bars into it. Let cool and serve.                                     

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